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20121116
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to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session. the president made it clear in his victory speech last night that he thinks the country wants an end to gridlock. >> tonight, you voted for action, not politics as usual. ( applause ) you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. and in the coming weeks and months, i am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties to meet the challenges we can only solve together: reducing our deficit; reforming our tax code; fixing our immigration system; freeing ourselves from foreign oil. we've got more work to do. ( applause ) >> reporter: the most immediate challenge: avoiding the so- called "fiscal cliff" that looms
>> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. a day after the election a massive selloff on wall street as investors worry about the status quo in washington. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. the election is over but the fiscal cliff, is just eight weeks away, and it will play into every decision the president makes until january first. >> susie: and the fiscal cliff is a big worry for business leaders. the c.e.o. of caesars entertainment, tells us it'll be "very damaging" for his company. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! wall street greeted the election results with a big sell-off in stocks. investors dumped shares of almost every type, giving the s&p 500 it's worst day since june. beyond the u.s. elections, europe also brought fresh worries for investors with concerns in greece, and germany. here's how the numbers stacked up on wall street. the dow lost 312 points, at it's worst point of the day, the blue chip index was down 369 points. the nasdaq tumbled nearly 75 points and the s&p 500 off 33. suzanne pratt takes a look at where the market goes from
that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> this week, the post-election rubio. >> i still wish i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. >> and where do we go from here? >> mr. president, we stand ready to work with you. >> the republicans take a look at their game plan. >> i think republicans have done a lousy job of reaching out to people of color. >> an amazing campaign. let me be clear. i did not bill that. you build that. >> also a look at ballot initiatives, including legalizing pot. >> this is the best day of my life. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> it was a long, anxious night for a lot of people in this town and across the nation, but then the networks called ohio and you knew it was over. the president won 93% of african-americans, a 71% of hispanics, more women than romney. he won 52% of voters under 34. half the independent voters. 54% of those who make over $100,000 a year. first we will hear from the president. >> i believe we can lead this future together because we are not as divided
forward. tonight, in this election you, the american people, reminded us that while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have picked ourselves up. we have fought our way back, and we know, in our hearts, that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. whether you held an obama sign or a romney sign, you made your voice heard and you made a difference. >>> the tally. president obama 50%. 58 millian votes. mitt romney, 48%. 56 million votes. so much for the popular vote. the electoral vote. 270 needed to win. president obama 303, governor romney 206. still unassigned, 29, florida is conducting a recount. >>> was this election a mandate, a landslide, a rout, a speaker, a marginal win, what was it? >> it is a significant victory by the president of the united states by more than 2 million votes, john. i don't believe it is a mandate. >> why isn't a mandate if it is such a big win? >> a mandate for what? a mandate to work together, certainly the entire country wants that. but the real fire bell in the night on this election is for the republican party. the
gwen: the president's convincing re-election, the looming fiscal cliff and tonight, a c.i.a. bombshell. victory and fallout, tonight on "washington week." the lines were long. the victory party was robust. >> a long campaign is now over. and whether i earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you. and you've made me a better president. gwen: a the thank yous were fervert. >> i'm really proud of all of you. it will go on in history. people will read about it it. and they'll marvel about it. >> as president obama claimed his second term. the election turned out to be a lesson in truth and consequences. what did the obama campaign do right and what did the romney campaign do wrong? >> and i ran for office because i'm concerned about americans. this election is over. but our principles endure. >> the voters have their say. leaving washington to search for a compromise even as a fiscal crisis looms. >> this is an opportunity for the president to lead. this is his. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal
elected its president, china has begun the process of anointing its next leader. but no election here, instead, 2000 communist party delegates, including many from the army gathered for their progress. .hina's 1.3 billion people the communist party has reform in china, but not in a normal way. it is an anomaly. is an authoritarian regime running the world's second- biggest economy. modern leaders paying homage to pass commonness, mouse at all -- mao tse tung included. >> we must crack down on corruption at all times and thoroughly investigate cases of major corruption. anyone who breaks the law, whoever they are, must be brought to justice without mercy. gregg's the successor, the current vice president, was chosen by party leaders five years ago in a process of back room deals and compromises. he will be installed as the new general secretary next week. outside, china looks increasingly modern. there is a widespread sense that growth is slipping and what is needed now is more reform. but a fear that the party may not be able to relax the market still has on part of the economy or sub
policies could change as election day demographics change. that and more tonight on nbr! the u.s. economy would be driven into recession next year if the fiscal cliff is not solved in time. that's the warning again today from the congressional budget office. and the standard and poor's ratings agency said there's an increasing chance we will go over that cliff of tax increases and spending cuts. it puts the odds at 15%. still, s&p is optimistic about a solution, saying "the most likely scenario, in our view, is that policymakers reach sufficient political compromise in time to avoid most, if not all, potential economic effects of the cliff." both s&p and the congressional budget office warned unemployment would go over 9% by the end of next year if the cliff is triggered. those s&p comments hit the market in the last 30 minutes of trading, extending yesterday's sharp losses. the dow closed down 121 points, the nasdaq lost 41, and the s&p was off 17. the headlines of big sell-offs in the major stock averages only further erode confidence for already nervous investors. suzanne pratt tonight
the way through. just amazing to be there on that final night. this was a much different election night than 2008, when 250,000 people greeted this sort of landmark moment. barack obama is more weathered, he's -- >> belva: graying. >> graying, but boy, the -- the democrats there, it was just pandemonium. and i think -- this time, it was tears of relief. instead of joy. that this contest has been so tough, so expensive and so important in so many ways and we saw it so negative that i think people are glad it's over, but to be there and to watch the president give that address and we heard him today in washington talking about what happens now in this country. i think the republicans learned from this election, what we saw in this election, we've seen in california decades before. the ethnic vote, the latino vote, the youth vote, the women's vote. this is -- this has been an electorate that's made a difference, reshaped california politics and we see what's happened here with the republicans now down to 29% of the vote. >> belva: i want to turn to paul, because paul has special powers. yo
our look at the fallout from this year's presidential election with frank rich, the former ku near times writer. his piece in the magazine this week is called "fighting sea- fantasyland." he joins us tonight from new york. good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you as always. thank you. tavis: i would want to start with the news of the day. there is so much news. congress is back in session for this lame duck session as it were. clearly, the top of the agenda for them and i suspect for the nation is how they keep the country from going over what has been referred to as the fiscal cliff. a lot easier to say then sequestration trade your thoughts on how serious both sides have to be or if in fact will be in coming to some grand bargain, some solution. these days following the election. >> they will be fairly serious. the first thing that has to happen is the republicans have to get over their shock of losing an election they thought they were going to win. we realize their leverage is rather limited. already we're seeing certainly that in the case of john boehner
the election. china gets ready to take a new generation. the u.s. voters have spoken, and after a hard-fought campaign, they have reelected barack obama. right now the president and his family have returned to the white house, where they will be residents for the next four years. right now it is about watching the votes come in. mr. obama has won 303 alike toro college of votes. mr. romney had 260. for the popular vote, president obama had 50.1%. nit romney hadn't 48.3%. -- mitt romney had 48.3%. we go to chicago for the obama victory. >> this is what the three looks like, a moment of it -- what victory looks like, a moment of triumph. it is not near happiness. it is a dream and the man who embodies it. barack obama savored the moment. he became the first black american to win a second term. he basked in the pride of his wife and daughters. he said alexian's can be small and silly but this was big and important. vice whether i have earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you, and you have made me a better president. with your stories and your struggles, i r
remember about this election? >> well, the first thing i'll remember is the way people turned out to vote in this election in the face of tremendous voter suppression efforts. and i just think they've been really american heroes because they stood up and said, "you are not going to take the vote away from us." some people stood in line for six, seven and eight hours. some had been in areas that had been damaged by the storm. and i just think that they were there upholding democracy. so that's the first thing that i remember about it. >> they were also there making delicious pecan tarts. because when i voted, the kids in the school were selling baking goods, and they were having a great time of it. what will you remember? >> oh, that's a tough one to say. i think that for a lot of conservatives and a lot of republicans this was a very disappointing election that opened a lot of folks' eyes to some of the deeper changes that have happened in the country, much more so in some respects than the 2008 election -- which i think a lot of folks wrote off as a one off, as a fluke, something that re
democrat to win two terms in more than 100 years. a look at what this election means for the nation and president and for both parties with larry king. he continues to cover politics and more on his new show, "larry king now." join us for conversation about election night. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we continue to digest the results of last night, i could not think of a better person to break down the results that a man who has covered so many of these. how many? since what year? >> on the broadcast of 1960. >> i was born in 1964. >> stop it. i was on the radio and television in 1960. it was the first televised debate. tavis: i remember this. >> nixon
presidential election behind us, perhaps we can get past the petty bickering and focus on the issues on our lives. the so-called war on drugs, eugene jarecki turns his lens on the drug issue. his new documentary is called "the house i live in" and was awarded at the sundance festival. conversation with eugene jarecki coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: eugene jarecki is an award winning filmmaker whose previous projects include "why we fight." is the latest project is "the house we live in." here are some scenes. >> you have to understand the war on drugs has never been about drugs. >> americas public enemy number one is a drug abuse. >>
that was presented on election night but because of the lateness of the hour many people didn't see it. it is about america's future, not with standing who the president is. joining me are tom brocaw, ally gutmann, david brooks and jon meacham. >> they have to taker it out of column a and say some seizure are right and some of the issues on education and inequity are right and i'm going to take it out of both sides and that will just confuse everybody. but more people in the country between the tweeting and blogging would say interesting. >> rose: america and its future, the america moment when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> right here at home. >> that future is out there waiting for us. >> rose: a politician thinks of the next election, a statesman of the next gentlemen of the jury race said the theologian james clerk and you can't govern in poetry or pros. we want to raise this question. where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth and where is it going, the challenge of the next administration to both immediate and deep. no great country sustain
for office because i'm concerned about america. this election is over but our principles endure. that i believe the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurgent economy and to renewed greatness. like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the field. we have given all our to this campaign. (cheers and applause) i so wish -- i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. but the nation chose another leader so ann and i join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation. >> rose: the race revealed america's shifting fault lines. it was a national conversation carried out in a few battleground states. billions of dollars poured into the campaign as both sides sought to define the other as responsible for the country's economic and partisan gridlock. but when it became clear that the long race had ended, both candidates spoke of the need for moving past division. here is what the president said. >> and in the coming weeks and months i am looking forward to reaching out and w
of the next election, a statesman of the next gentlemen of the jury race said the theologian james clerk and you can't govern in poetry or pros. we want to raise this question. where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth and where is it going, the challenge of the next administration to both immediate and deep. no great country sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with a fiscal cliff. partisan grid lock has present us from making hard decisions about where we need to stand and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequity. while we remain the richest country of the world the economic order is rebalancing. economic powers are changing as we've seen to the response of the arab spring. defining east, demands between china and the united states and the realization it is not a zero sum game. there are problems that transcend are lationships, climate change global health and science. science and technology are giving us extraordinary insight who we are and how much we share. enormous power for both s
. such a prospect has spooked global markets. riding high on re-election euphoria, democrats claim a popular mandate, he insists on higher tax rates from the wealthiest americans. the republicans know the president can't get much done without them and they say they will be led by him, but their position is firm. >> the number one issue was about the economy and jobs. everybody wants to get the economy moving again and americans back to work. raising tax rates will slow down our ability to create the jobs that everyone says they want. >> a few days after the election, both parties are stressing that they are willing to work together on the urgent issue of the fiscal cliff. they don't want to be seen playing politics when bar are very real question is for america. can they put their differences behind them? after the rock motions of this week when president obama thank his campaign team -- >> i am really proud of all of you. >> it applied to congress as well. >> of the assistant managing editor of time, the latest issues devoted to the aftermath of the campaign. i spoke a brief time about the importan
that done. >> reporter: the president says one of the clearest messages of the election was his pledge to raise taxes on the wealthiest americans and he gave no hints today he was ready to change that position now that he has won a second term. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: as darren mentioned, the markets took the president's comments as proof we won't be able to reach a deal and avoid the fiscal cliff, stocks on wall street tumbled: the dow fell 185 points, the nasdaq lost 37, the s&p was down 19. james awad joins us now. he's investment strategist at zephyr management. >> so, jim, what do you think investors need to hear from the president that they feel confident about investing in the markets? >> right now, there is nothing he is willing to do that would make investors comfortable. you'll notice today that the market sold off during and after his press conference because he was very aggressive in his position. and whether that's a negotiating point or not, i think what the markets fear is that we could either accidentally go over the cliff, or that all this hard po
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: for more tonight on the election of 2012 and what it means beyond the results, i am pleased to be joined by amy goodman. she is the host of "democracy now!" and her new book is called "the silent majority." she joins us from new york. good to have you back on this program. >> it is great to be with you, tavis. tavis: there so as to talk about. your thoughts on what happened this week, giuliani presidential race and whether you were surprised by any of the results. >> i definitely thought that president obama would win. when you look at what mitt romney said along the way, when you looked at his actions, when you look at the 47%, i wondered if he would win, if his number would be 47%, talking about the people who would not vote for him. but president obama, now in his second term, i think presents us an extremely interesting challenge to many of the people who voted for him. i mean, you now have the community organizer in chief as the commander-in-chief. that started in 2008. the question is who does the community org
to overreach. but he still did say, "look, i have this mandate. the american people put-- re-elected me to fight for the middle class, yes and you can tell that-- you know, he hasn't said what he said when he was first elected that we've heard him say elections have consequences, but actions speak louder than words now. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the new film called "life of pi." >> i don't think there's a movie or book to make you believe in god as they advertise it. but i hope people believe in storytelling, and when you see this boy it is like a sign of god, say. directing him is not so much like directing, teaching him, but wake him up, reminding him-- seems like what he already knows from the previous lives. >> rose: the president's press conference and the "life of pi" next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> i'm al hunt of "bloomberg news" filling in for charlie rose from washington. we quinn if th evening with news from the white house. president obama heldaise first press conference since his reele
in washington. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell lost ground in the election, but he posed for the cameras with the three new senators who will be joining his side of the aisle in january. in the house, minority leader nancy pelosi beamed as she presented the new faces adding to democratic ranks in the coming congress. given what awaits these new lawmakers in january, you might wonder why they want the job. it's still not clear whether a lame duck session of congress will navigate the expiring tax breaks and automatic spending cuts that make up the fiscal cliff. the president met privately with labor leaders to discuss options for the fiscal cliff. tomorrow, he will caucus with c.e.o.s from companies like wal-mart, g.e. and bank of america. it all leads up to friday when the president sits down with congressional leaders at the white house to begin the real negotiations, and both sides enter those talks claiming a mandate to protect the principals the voters endorsed at the ballot box. >> darren gersh is with us tonight from our washington, d.c. bureau, where a week after e
to become a war president. remember the education president? that got blown up by a war. obama was elected on a domestic agenda. he wants to be the guy you gotta side of iraq and afghanistan. and did not destroy his domestic agenda. lbj hasted great domestic agenda and had -- had this great domestic agenda but was ruined as a president by the vietnam war. when you walk into the oval office, president obama looks up and he sees the vietnam general walking hand. you are his worst nightmare. i am here to ruin your presidency. i think is a hard problem. the media does not want to pay attention. we just have a presidential campaign with the war in afghanistan hardly mentioned. i would be appalled if i were a parent who had a kid in afghanistan. what does that say about us? we're putting our kids out there. it says we are not taking our wars seriously. we're fighting for them but we're fighting them with a casual air against. if you're going to go to work, pay some -- war, pay some damn attention. the sense of not having skin in the game in this country, it really bothers me. tavis: that is a so
bit more interested in working together. now, again this is just one day after the election. so let's see if that holds up. it does look like there are a few olive branches out there. we'll see if it continues. >> putting the odds at one in seven, one in eight we could still go over the cliff. cow agree that that will plunge the u.s. economy into recession and an unemployment rate back over 9%. >> i'm about in agreement with them. i think there are a few details i'm looking for. i look for the bush tax cuts to expire, the payroll tax holiday to expire, and that tow moo is a 3% cracks of the fiscal budget, and that would, indeed, push, in my analysis, push the u.s. back into recession. >> tom: what's the impact if we go over the cliff but are able to pull ourselves back, say, the first or second week in january. some are saying there are some odds of that happening. we could go over the cliff do see the threat but pull ourselves back. could there be damage done that's irreversible? >> there-- when you think about it, the fiscal cliff is sort of kind of a theoretical thing. the treasu
. the turkish foreign minister congratulating the just elected leader of the new unified syrian opposition coalition. turkey and its allies and friends and syria a group of nations that backed the face serious opposition have pledged to give it full recognition and support. we will do everything possible to get recognition from this new body. we will work with the arab league and the gulf states, europe, and america and it will announce recognition of your counsel as the only legitimate representative of the syrians. while the west clearly hopes the unification of opposition groups could be a turning point back -- could be a turning point, the regime had dismissed meetings out of hand. with the only dialogue going on is on the battlefield which is moving in relentlessly around the capitol like here in the damascus suburbs. the unified opposition and its outside backers insist that bashar assad must go before there can be any dialogue. he is clearly not ready to do that. >> the war in syria continues as do their regional implications. when the head of the cia resigns after admitting to an e
, questions are being asked about the timing of the assassination two months before the israeli election. in the past, military strikes have been used to send messages about the toughness of israeli leaders. >> we will take whatever action is necessary to put a stop to this. this is not merely our right. it is also our duty. >> hamas has sworn to hit back. they said the same thing during the last gossan warner -- gazan war. this showed limitations against israel's army. before the assassination, the egyptian government had been working to establish a cease- fire, and efforts have been praised by top security officials. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east to
, through a formal channel, informal channel before the election that people just kind of sat on and then it went in a more formal chain of command way, they acted instantly once he heard about it. was there something before then, as john said a minute ago, in this full scale investigation that will be a key question. >> i agree about why it didn't make its way up the chain of command. however, in some of these cases there are people inside the whitehouse that make sure the president is inoculated from learning, exactly. so usually it's the whitehouse chief of staff who does that. i think there's a question about whether there was someone in the whitehouse that knew about it and there was a political decision given that this was two weeks, a week out from the whitehouse a couple days whenever then they knew about it, to not tell the president for possible deniability for that very reason which could certainly have happened. >> rose: this is what's interesting. john miller sitting here with us worked for general clacker, the dni as they say. >> i was the deputy of foreign anal
, and with concern for the broader good. to me, america post-election feels a lot like the middle of groundhog day. same president; same parties controlling congress; same leaders of congress likely to emerge. and, the same problem confronting the nation: yet another fiscal cliff. everyone knows the damage that falling over the fiscal cliff may bring: further policy gridlock, a sudden recession, and an unknowably bad shock to worldwide demand for u.s. debt. to avoid this fiscal damage, america today needs some people to step up and show the leadership of bill murray. to acknowledge that the country needs some mix of spending restraint and tax-revenue increases while both stimulating growth and protecting the vulnerable. and, to do all this with the necessary imagination. both parties have acknowledged the need for fundamental corporate-tax reform. who will lead the charge on cutting americas business taxes- but linked to reducing high-end tax expenditures to not further aggravate our deficits? here is hoping that in the coming days, americas fiscal life can imitate bill murray's art. i'm matt slau
news conference since the election. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight: we have extended excerpts of the president's wide-ranging exchange with reporters, from immigration to benghazi to reaching out to mitt romney. >> woodruff: we zero in on two topics, starting with the spiraling scandal that forced the c.i.a. director to step down. >> ifill: and we assess the administration's post-election agenda with senators dick durbin and kay bailey hutchison. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez gets the latest on the escalating violence in gaza after israeli air strikes killed the military leader of hamas. >> ifill: plus, there were new calls today for laws to police pharmacies like the one linked to the meningitis outbreak. betty ann bowser's update includes the story of one family's loss from the disease. >> i can't really think of one them them without the other. he was such a vibrant person that who lit up the room and there's such a great big hole missing. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newsh
the election, and insisted once again he won't accept a deal unless it includes higher taxes on the wealthy. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we'll have excerpts from the president's remarks, and our own debate on the economic challenges ahead with two senators, maryland democrat ben cardin and tennessee republican bob corker. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez has the latest on the surprise resignation of cia chief david petraeus after admitting to an extra-marital affair. >> brown: it's still cold and dark in many new jersey homes. special correspondent rick karr follows utility crews as they work to turn the electricity back on. >> access to these lines is quite difficult, cutting through peoples' backyards. you may come in one and cross four other yards just to get to your job site. >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: intel >> music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident, i was worrie
. >> woodruff: with the election over, there's new talk in washington about finally coming to grips with taxes, spending and the deficit. the mammoth problem has been hanging over congress and president for many months, and now, time is running out. in just five days, lawmakers troop back to the capitol for a final, lame-duck session. and they are under mounting pressure to avoid going off the much-talked-about fiscal cliff. come january 1, the bush-era tax cuts will expire as will a 2% payroll tax cut that was passed in december of 2010. at the same time, large automatic spending cuts would begin to bite-- 10% less for defense in 2013 and an 8% cut in domestic programs. the result-- according to federal reserve chairman ben bernanke-- could be disastrous. he said this in july, citing the congressional budget office. >> the c.b.o. has estimated that if the full range of tax increases and spending cuts were allowed to take effect, a scenario widely referred to as the fiscal cliff-- a shallow recession would occur early next year and about one and a quarter million fewer jobs would be created in
director james clapper last week on election day. he then telephoned petraeus and asked him to resign. on thursday, the general went to the white house to meet with president obama and his formal resignation followed on friday. since then, key members of congress have complained that they should have been notified much earlier that something was up. senate intelligence committee chair democrat dianne feinstein appeared on fox news yesterday. >> we received no advance notice. it was like a lightning bolt. the way i found out, i came back to washington thursday night. friday morning, the staff director told me there were a number of calls from press about this. this is something that could have had an effect on national security. i think we should have been told. >> brown: on cnn the chairman of the house homeland security committee, republican congressman peter king, also raised concerns. >> this just doesn't add up that you have this type of investigation. the f.b.i. investigating emails. the emails leading to the c.i.a. director and taking four months to find out that the c.i.a. dire
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)

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